History

Indiana Archaeology Month starts September 1st

From the Indiana Department of Natural Resources:

Next month marks the 25th anniversary of a statewide celebration of archaeology in Indiana.

First came Indiana Archaeology Week, which ran from 1996-2001. Starting the next year, the celebration expanded to Indiana Archaeology Month. This year’s celebration starts Sept. 1, which Gov. Eric J. Holcomb has declared Indiana Archaeology Month Kickoff Day.

All month long, Hoosier history buffs can meet archaeologists and learn about the state’s fascinating past. Through the past years’ celebrations, thousands of members of the public have been able to experience archaeology in this and many other ways.

A variety of events for all ages will be offered by universities, museums, organizations, and individuals throughout Indiana. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Historic Preservation & Archaeology (DHPA) coordinates the activities. A schedule of events and additional information is at on.IN.gov/archaeologymonth.

“Archaeology tells us not only about the past but also sheds light about ourselves today and our future,” said Dan Bortner, DNR director and State Historic Preservation Officer. “Archaeology Month provides a perfect way for Hoosiers to find out how, with programs that are not only educational and informative but also fun.”

This year’s commemorative poster, which features historic Indiana schoolhouse sites,highlights DHPA’s role in celebrating archaeology through this annual event. The poster is also printed on a full page of the September/October issue of Outdoor Indiana magazine and can also be viewed at the Archaeology Month website shown above.

“Archaeological investigation at such types of sites can teach us much about the lives of the students and teachers who were part of these important Hoosier places,” said State Archaeologist Amy Johnson.

Overall, archaeologists have recorded more than 71,000 sites in Indiana since the early 1800s, helping shape public understanding of the pre-contact and historic people who also called the land we now call Indiana home.

Photo by Ylanite Koppens from Pexels

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